Apr 212011
 

Emissions from the 1883 Krakatau eruption generated dramatic sunsets around the world. The colorful skies inspired many sketches and paintings, like this one by England's William Ashcroft.

Emissions from the 1883 Krakatau eruption generated dramatic sunsets around the world. The colorful skies inspired many sketches and paintings, like this one by England's William Ashcroft.

Krakatau (aka Krakatoa), in Indonesia’s Sunda Strait west of Java and east of Sumatra, exploded in August 1883 with 26 times the power of the biggest H-bomb test.  The eruption turned deadly on the afternoon of Aug. 26, with the first explosion coming at 1 p.m. A column of black ash soon rose 17 miles into the sky above the Sunda Strait.

The collapse of the volcano into the sea generated 100-foot tidal waves obliterating hundreds of villages and taking more than 36,000 lives. Much reduced, the sea wave swept past the Cape of Good Hope into the Atlantic Ocean and even caused a measurable ripple in the English Channel.

The Scream of Nature, Painted by Edvard Much

The Scream of Nature, Painted by Edvard Much

The noise was heard at Alice Springs in the middle of Australia. Four hours after the massive explosion, 3,000 miles away on the island of Rodrigues in the western Indian Ocean, it was recorded as the “roar of heavy guns.” The sound was audible over 1/13 the surface of the globe, according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

The final eruption also threw pumice an estimated 34 to 50 miles into the sky. Dust fell more than 3,000 miles away 10 days later. Islands of pumice floated on the oceans for months. Sulfur in the ash reacted with atmospheric ozone to scatter sunlight, causing vivid red sunsets around the world. Global temperatures dropped, and climate disruptions lasted five years.

It spewed sulfur into the atmosphere, disrupting the climate of the Earth for 5 years, and causing vivid red sunsets all over the world.It made sunsets across the world change color. The effects of the Krakatau eruption is thought to be the inspiration for the red sunset in Edvard Munch’s famous painting “The Scream”.

Anak Krakatau

Anak Krakatau Today, A Challenging Site to be Visited

Anak Krakatau Today, A Challenging Site to be Visited


Half a century after Krakatau’s epic explosion, a new volcano broke through the surface of the ocean. Anak Krakatau, for “child of Krakatau,” remains active and grows about five inches a week.

The site today’s defined by the Gov of Indonesia as a Nature Reserve area, protecting three islands surrounding the Anak Krakatau, which are : Rakata island [the island of Krakatau], Sertung island, and Panjang island.

These islands can be reached by boat from Carita beach [Java Island] and Lampung [Sumatra Island]. The islands provide attractive tourism attractions like diving, fishing, bird watching, and trekking.  

Legon Cabe, a Perfect Place for 'Hide' Away

Legon Cabe, a Perfect Place for 'Hide' Away

Yet, these islands are highly challenging to reached. In few seasons, the sea waves are much high, thus required a strong gut the across the Legon Cabe, a Perfect Place for ‘Hide’ AwaySunda strait.

However, as you arrived in Legon cabe area at the Rakata island, you can suddenly enjoy the blue of sea water, and the tranquility of the island. It’s definitely an appropriate place to hide from the daily routines. Interested to visit these historical islands? Don’t worry, there are currently plenty of travel agents offering tour packages to these islands. Just call them, and have a challenging trip!

source: http://www.tnol.co.id/id/component/content/article/168-travel/5403-krakatau-eruption-that-changed-the-world.html

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)